Being ‘body-aware’ allows choice

Harsh proposals for withdrawal of treatment from smokers and obese people were rejected by ministers for inclusion in Lord Darzi’s recent draft NHS constitution, but it includes the patient’s right to stipulate the type of treatment they want – aiming to increase  the patients’ responsibility in managing their own health.

 

In addition, increased medical technology, in the field of genetic testing for example, allows further choice and the moral dilemma of how to deal with the knowledge that we, or our future family, may be predisposed to a particular condition.

 

Armed with the knowledge that we could be at a higher risk of compromised health, we can choose to take steps to mediate that risk if possible or alternatively, to optimistically keep our fingers crossed and hope we are statistically lucky.

 

I like to be fully informed about my body and its health; I really enjoyed studying Anatomy and Physiology during my massage training, so I could understand how to ‘run’ this sophisticated biological machine as efficiently and effectively as possible.

 

Being ‘body-aware’ – noticing how we feel on a day to day basis – gives us the opportunity to pick up on any imbalance and make a choice to take necessary steps to get back on track. I find yoga sessions very fruitful, when the stillness and peace of the class allows me to focus on my body.

 

A massage session can also be a good opportunity to do a ‘body-check’ when I and the client become aware of areas that need attention – either physically because of tension or stress which manifests in muscles or mind, or behaviourally because of lifestyle issues, such as posture or diet. As we become more attuned to the workings of our body, this self-assessment can be a useful tool towards preventative healthcare.

safe anabolic steroids order prescription drugs online without doctor limo atlanta kamagra jelly gevaarlijk prom limo

crossfit trainingsplan

Comments are closed.