Feeling ‘under the weather’? – Let the sun shine in!

Weather has short and long term effects on our bodies according to biometeorologists – scientists who study this connection. “UV-A and UV-B light in small doses has a stimulating and harmonising effect on our energy levels, immune systems, metabolism, blood pressure, blood sugar levels, endocrine system and our ability to concentrate, work and learn.” (Dr Jacob Libermann, ‘Light – Medicine of the Future/Dr. Zane R. Kime, ‘Sunlight could save your life’)

Our reactions to the weather affect the production of hormones in our bodies which are also affected by pain and stress, resulting in a cocktail of ‘enemies’ which can combine to lead to us feeling ‘under par’.

We are well aware of the damage to unprotected skin by the ultra violet rays of the sun and high levels of sunlight to eyes may be harmful. We are also cautioned about exposure to sunlight when taking certain medications, after using particular toiletries or having a massage with phototoxic essential oils such as Bergamot, Ginger and the citrus oils which make you more photosensitive and accelerate that painful and harmful sunburn.

But it’s not all bad news – these cautions shouldn’t put us off getting a healthy daily dose of sunshine – even just 10 minutes is beneficial. It is needed by our bodies to make vitamin D which boosts our immune system and aids calcium absorption, to promote healthy bone growth. Vitamin D is also available from food sources such as milk, oily fish and egg yolks but some sunshine on our eyes has the added advantage of affecting our hypothalamus which governs mood among other things.

The late arrival of summer seems to have contributed to a general low mood this year, but a daily dose of this free ‘medicine’ could help perk us up again.

‘Southwell Life’ – Sept 2007

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